Home > Library > NESTEC Paper: Engineer’s View On Scrap Metal Recycling In Nigeria

NESTEC Paper: Engineer’s View On Scrap Metal Recycling In Nigeria

ABSTRACT

This study describes the secondary refining process in scrap metal recycling and investigates factors affecting Nigerians from establishing a scrap metal recycling industry, being the brain/muscle behind the growth of existing recycling industries, and their confidence level in handling scrap metal recycling company. A survey questionnaire was used to navigate throughout the research and a total of one-hundred-and-seventy-nine (179) members of staff and workers were randomly sampled for the study. The data obtained were analyzed using percentages. The study distils that factors such as poor government planning, poor education and inadequate exposure of Nigerian metallurgists, amongst others are the major retardants to the growth of Nigerians handling the recycling industry when investors are willing to invest. The findings revealed that Nigerians working in the recycling industry are the brain and muscle behind the industry’s growth. Despite their contributions, peanuts are been given as accolades. Amongst other things, there is a need for a strong magnetic pole to attract investors in the scrap metal recycling industry. Base on my findings, it was recommended that the federal government should create an enabling environment that will encourage investors to support Nigerians in growing their scrap metal recycling industry.

Keywords: confidence, engineers, investor, scrap metal recycling, secondary refining

READ ALSO  Nigeria Economic Sustainability Plan (Ref. CS0038)

Author: Eze, Ebuka Harrison

Click Nestec Paper Below For Full Paper and make your COMMENTS

NESTEC Paper

 

21
1

260 thoughts on “NESTEC Paper: Engineer’s View On Scrap Metal Recycling In Nigeria

  1. Brilliant work, Ebuka!

    Nigeria’s steel/metal industry has been overlooked long enough. It’s surprising how we’re paying so little attention to what we could gain so much from.
    Well done.

    3

    0
  2. Great Piece you have here Mr Harrison. I think more light also should be shed on the young boys in our communities that walk around picking Metals for recycling during school hours.
    I dare say that field could boom beyond what we see.

    2

    0
  3. Permit me to say that this abstract dwindled both back and forth in a way. The title of your paper as written above is “Engineers view on scrap metal recycling in Nigeria” and as I navigate around your method I noticed that you used questionaire as ways of getting your information. The questions to ask are:
    1. Who did the questionaire address?
    2. What was the purpose of using the questionaire?
    3. How does members and staff as used in your work correlate to the topic you are discussing?
    4. What do you mean by the term inadequate exposure of Nigeria metallurgist because I feel you touched a nerve there?

    1

    0
    1. Thank you for the remarks

      All your questions are answered in the paper. Moreso, the questionnaire addresses (majorly) staff and contract workers working in a scrap metal recycling company.

      The questionnaire was used to obtain data, amongst others, on the factors affecting Nigerians from harnessing the scrap metal recycling industry.

      Members of staff are those people working in a scrap metal industry such as metallurgist and engineers of other disciplines.

      Majority of what is been taught in schools are obselete. Advanced and more productive methods of recycling scrap to obtain steel are not taught in school. Most of the engineers doing it in the steel firm got the knowledge there and not from school. The hug gap between reality and theory should be bridged. Inadequate exposure of Nigerian metallurgist simply means that freshly graduated engineers are not well exposured in advance for engineering principles.

      A metallurgist that graduated from a well known University in Nigeria could not identity an electric induction furnace in reality but can tell you the heating processes or principles on paper

      3

      0
      1. Good to know you replied but I think certain clarity should be brought to the table.
        1. An abstract is a summarized version of your work meaning, one can tell the direction it is going without too much explanation from the author.
        2. The word for member of staff as used is ambiguous because it can mean a whole lot of things which automatically rules out what you have in mind.
        3. Using one example of a metallurgist as a case study is indeed very poor for a research work of this magnitude.
        4. Your work did not tell the names of the industry you took you data from because it was spelt that you took statistical data but no name of the company or industry.

        2

        0
        1. I am glad you are attentive to details but I still think you should read the research methodology carefully.

          Permit me to call your attention to some key words. Members of staff was used to connote the plural form of staff. And one metallurgist was not used as a case study. I just gave you an instance.

          In Nigeria, many industries are defaulting in terms of worker’s safety and well-being.
          Mentioning the firms where i obtained data would place me on a greater risk in future. That was why I said, “Stringent detailed were observed as to who would participate in the survey…”

          It’s a real brave and interesting questions you pointed out, it will jar reader’s attention to details. Thank you for being real.

          Sorry for the repetition.

          1

          0
  4. I am glad you are attentive to details but I still think you should read the research methodology carefully.

    Permit me to call your attention to some key words. Members of staff was used to connote the plural form of staff. And one metallurgist was not used as a case study. I just gave you an instance.

    In Nigeria, many industries are defaulting in terms of worker’s safety and well-being.
    Mentioning the firm where i obtained data from would place me on a greater risk in the future. That was why I said, “Stringent detailed were observed as to who would participate in the survey…”

    It’s a real brave and interesting questions you pointed out, it will jar reader’s attention to details. Thank you for being real.

    0

    0
    1. I will say that it is great having to chat with you on this subject. In as much as the subject matter carry some weight of convincing analogy, I still will want to draw your attention to what I call the “statistical breakdown of this mind-blowing project”. Since you made your research on this, what would you say will be the statistical breakdown of this work to the economy of Nigeria. Do well to show the statistical representation in per annum, periodic situation and also In a succession of growth.

      1

      0
  5. Well articulated research work. Our teaching patterns and level of exposure of engineering systems in high schools and universities are very poor. In the company where I work a young graduate couldn’t draw the iron carbon phase diagram correctly. We also showed him aluminium pebbles but he couldn’t identify it was aluminium. I strongly believed that the government is the only body capable of liberating Nigerians from this calamity. Because of the multidimensional nature of metallurgical engineering both the government and capable investors need to put hands on deck.

    Kudo Mr. Harrison

    1

    0
    1. Very true sir. The government and investors must work together. Policies have to be set properly to support indigenous recycling industries. We can do the job, we have to believe in ourselves.

      0

      0
  6. Harrison, I must commend your good works in the field of metallurgical and materials engineering.

    Metallurgy still remains the building block of every other engineering discipline. What can we achieve without metals? But this is not so in Nigeria…

    Recycling is really a great idea, and I still wonder why Nigerians are not harnessing those areas. I think, the government is the prime contributor to the shame that befall Nigerian engineers. A man that owns a house is responsible for what is and what not to be done in the house. This is not so in Nigeria, foreigner would come and treat Nigerians like rags. I still wonder why those contract workers still feels happy doing a job that offers N70.83 per hour.

    I just hope this work won’t end here. Bravo to you. Metallurgy has been overlooked in Nigeria and it’s time for them to wake up. The government and investors need them badly.

    You earn my respect!

    0

    0
    1. Thank you sir. Our leader are failing us, I hope they will realize the consequences of their action early enough. But, we as engineers need to cry out loudly because that is one way we can make them feel our significance.

      We can only make choices when we have options, those contract workers have no choice but to face reality.

      We can set the pace right when we all work together.

      Thank you very much sir!

      0

      0
  7. Nice work!
    Though I would have suggested a more suiting topic describing that the “engineers view…”!
    Thanks

    0

    0
    1. If it happens, life will become better for millions of people. Though, it depends on the capacity of your plan. Thank you.

      1

      0
  8. I must say, this is a very inspiring article as scrap metal recycling is an aspect that if given more attention to, will greatly aid in the utilization of our national resources. Most importantly, changes supposed waste to a useful raw material. Nice work!

    1

    0
  9. Great and intelligent work, Mr. Harrison. With this in view, from your findings what can you really say about the metallurgists view in relation to non-metallurgists view as regards inadequate exposure of Nigerian metallurgist?

    0

    0
    1. Thank you sire! From the data obtained in the two views, it is obvious that our schools are not exposing the students properly to meet with the current advancement in technologies. Our teaching patterns should be equipped properly to bridge the gap between modern manufacturing process and the obselete ones.

      Thank you sire for this interesting question

      1

      0
  10. Great work, well researched and explained. We have got a lot to benefit from recycling in general if given maximum attention.
    Am proud of you

    0

    0
    1. Very key. If Maximum attention is channelled toward harnessing the recycling industry, it will improve the dire state of the Nigerian steel sector. And you know, steel is a pivotal to industrialization.
      Thank you Evangel

      1

      0
  11. Nice write up. How I wish Nigeria can have a glimpse of the fortune in metal recycling.

    Love the narrative Mr. Harrison.

    0

    0
    1. Recycling of metal scrap is the only way to sustain the steel sector in Nigeria, since those firms that involves the direct processing of steel from its virgin ore in Nigeria (i.e Ajaokuta steel complex) are epileptic.

      Thank you very much sir for your comments

      0

      0
  12. Great work Mr. Harrison. But, what is your view about Nigeria graduates as taking hold of recycling firms in Nigeria?

    0

    0
    1. Thank you very much for your question. It is an intelligent one, I must say.

      I guess you mean my personal view? Ok. My view, in consonance with the one obtained in the research, as per what is been taught in school doesn’t provide the basic exposure involved in recycling of scrap to obtain steel. Thus, Nigerian fresh graduate can’t completely take hold of the process. But with adequate exposure in conjunction with the theoretical aspects, Nigerian graduate would harness the recycling firm.

      I hope I have cleared the air.
      Thanks!

      0

      0
  13. “The findings revealed that Nigerians working in the recycling industry are the brain and muscle behind the industry’s growth. Despite their contributions, peanuts are been given as accolades” – Great work Harrison, thanks for bringing this to light.

    A proper paper!
    Good luck🤙🏻

    0

    0
    1. Wow! Thank you for responding!
      That’s just the painful part of the whole system.

      Thank you, Onuorah Uchenna

      0

      0
  14. The Federal government needs to encourage the scrap metal recycling industry in Nigeria, as this will improve the growth of the economy and control environmental pollution. Nice article Engineer Eze. Keep it up🙌🙌

    0

    0
  15. This is highly intelligent.

    Funny enough, less interest has been given to this field; scrap metal recycling. An environment favorable to our investors should be created to encourage the growth of this industry.
    #TogetherWeMakeNigeriaAbetterPlace

    0

    0
  16. I love your conclusion on this article ” Nigerian engineers in the field can harness the scrap metal recycling firms from scratch to finish if the support and capital is assured”. That is to say that support from the Federal government is a major factor behind the growth of the scrap metal recycling industry.. I strongly acknowledge this paper work. Keep it up. Mr Eze

    0

    0
  17. I agree, recycling industry truly is the brain and muscle. Attention should also be given to children and “abokis” that buy scrap metals, maybe an awareness program to know that they’re helping the nation in their means of survival.
    This a beautifully written awareness post and there should be more teachings/education on this. Well done

    0

    0
  18. It’s good to know how a little effort can create a ripple effect on the economy and technology. I am glad you made this effort to change the narrative and create impact.

    The work is great.

    0

    0
  19. Wow! Nice work dude…i hope one day Nigeria government will wake up from there slumber,because right away we are still in old age.

    0

    0
  20. This is an essay well thought of and targets everyone not just the metallurgist of other ways to make better our country. Well done

    0

    0
  21. It’s a nice write up, try putting more technical terms. The information’s provided are really self explanatory.

    0

    0
  22. Thank you, Mr. Eze for this article. How be it, I have few questions to ask:

    1. State and expatiate on the real benefits of metal recycling and relocate this to national economic growth.

    2. What do you imply by poor education and inadequate exposure of Nigerian Metallurgists?

    0

    0
    1. Thank you very much, Mr Victor for such an interesting question.

      Recycling offers myriad of opportunities to the environment and also to human’s well being. Recycling steel saves the exploration of natural or virgin ore and also reduce the amount of poisonous gases emitted to our surrounding.

      It provides jobs also sustains the production of steel (as alternative to that produced from virgin ore)

      It reduces the amount of poisonous gases inhaled by workers as compared to that generated from mining….

      Poor education here means that our educational system isn’t providing the basic knowledge needed to face the 21st century challenges in manufacturing.
      Our curriculum is outdated and obsolete, it can’t equipt the engineers (mostly metallurgist) to start up a recycling firm from scratch without consulting foreigners for their technical knowledge. Our poor educational system weakens our confidence as engineers because we don’t have the basic exposure to face the advanced world.

      Just like a recent post i read, where a structure collapse in an engineering faculty building in a university.

      I hope I have clear the dust in the air…? Thank you sir!

      0

      0
  23. Great Paper Harrison. It is my opinion that our current recycling culture for scrap metals is below what it should be especially considering its benefits to the environment. Based on your findings, what role do you feel public enlightenment can play in enhancing the use of scrap metals?

    0

    0
    1. Thank you sir:

      In Nigeria, recycling of metal scrap is perceived as a dirty business and meant for the poor masses.

      Enlightenment can help change that perception. Recycling is a legitimate business and not meant for the poor masses alone. This will increase the number of scrap collected per year(annual output)

      Enlightenment can also encourage scrap recycling by promoting(informing people about) the huge benefits to man and the environment.

      Thank you very much sir for this wonderful question.

      0

      0
  24. Pingback: buy chloroquine

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *